Memories before and after the Sound of Music by Agathe von Trapp

Summary:

The oldest daughter, but not the oldest child, of Captain Von Trapp and his first wife shares her memories of life in Austria before, during, and after World War II; life after her mother’s passing; Maria becoming her second mother; touring the world singing with her family; “The Sound of Music;” and where “the children” are now.

Opinion:

In the prelude, the author states that one of the reasons she wrote this book is to answer questions she’s heard over her lifetime: did they really climb the mountain to Switzerland; was their father really that strict; did they really learn to sing via “Do-Re-Mi,” etc. It didn’t surprise me that she had negative feelings toward the infamous musical/movie. Over time, she was able to separate her feelings and acknowledge that, while the musical/movie is inaccurate, through it, joy has been brought to generations.

This was a very interesting read. I became fixated on them during this past Easter while watching “The Sound of Music.” I really enjoyed this book and learned a lot about the family. As much as I would love to share some of the truths, I think you should read the book and find out for yourselves.

© Cori Endicott June 2012

The Story of the Trapp Family Singers by Maria Augusta Trapp

Summary:

Unless you lived under a rock, you have probably hear of “The Sound of Music.” This book chronicles how the family came to be and what it was like for them after fleeing Austria.

Opinion:

I’ll be quite honest; I did not finish this book. I got half-way before becoming tired of it. My main reason for picking this book up was to compare it to the musical. For instance, Captain Von Trapp did use a whistle to summon the children, but there was only one tune and it was used to call them in from outside since the property was extensive. They did not flee to Switzerland, but to Italy before taking a train to England, and then a boat to America. Like I said before, I didn’t finish the book because I lost interest. Too much repetitive moving about.

© Cori Endicott May 2012