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Archive for September, 2013

Summary:

A historical fiction novel recounting how Tituba came to work for Rev. Parris, her life as his slave, and the goings-on in Salem that led to the trials. All the characters are familiar, especially if you’ve watched or read Arthur Miller’s The Crucible.

Opinion:

A very quick read. It kept me interested, even though I already knew the ending. At times, I didn’t want to put the book down. Recommended, definitely.

It was shocking to see that the last name of Tituba’s mistress in Barbados was Endicott, my maiden name. I don’t know how accurate that piece of information is.

©Cori Endicott May 2013

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Summary:

The author interviews, analyzes, and remarks on the various genres of “gifted-ness.” She interviews parents, teachers, children, and the so-called “formerly gifted” adults. There are many different subjects where someone can be considered gifted.

Opinion:

There were times when I really enjoyed this book and other times when I had to slog through it. I’m not convinced that DVDs such as Baby Einstein are worth the investment. What seemed to stick out was that no matter the socio-economic status, children who had involved parents thrived, The chapter on the preaching contests was off-putting. It put me off because I don’t feel that it is write for teenagers to write sermons and enter contests in the hopes of winning a monetary prize.

If this subject interests you, read it.

©Cori Endicott May 2013

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Summary:

Is there a Holy Bloodline? If so, how and why has it stayed hidden all this time? This book is split into three parts: mystery, secret society, and bloodline. Each chapter and subsection builds on the previous information. Nothing is conclusively proven, but it does give you some food for thought.

Opinion:

This isn’t the first book I’ve read and reviewed about this subject. I do not attempt to change anyone’s mind, only to give my opinion.

Despite my interest in this subject, I found this book very difficult to get through. It has taken me the better part of a year to read this book because of the density of the information. I wished for a companion book or some sort of Cliffs Notes from time to time. Other times, I felt like I was back in AP European History class.

If you’re unsure about reading this book, jump to the conclusion. It summarizes things nicely, and it will give you an idea on whether or not this is something you should really read.

For those interested in a holy bloodline and grail-lore, recommend it.

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Summary:

Dave Ramsey teaches readers how to conquer their pile of debt, build an emergency fund, and save properly for the future. He makes it very clear that this isn’t a get rich quick scheme; that it will take lots of hard work and dedication. His motto, Live like no one else, so you can one day live like no one else, may not make sense at first, but when you do finally comprehend it, you will feel inspired.

Opinion:

Truth: for the longest time I thought Dave Ramsey was some other financial guru who likes to hear himself talk. I was given the audio book as a gift from someone who had tried his method and it worked for her family. He does have good ideas, thought I’m not a complete convert. Once fiancé listens to it as well, we’re going to discuss what we’d like to implement in our financial life.

Dave Ramsey’s website had a lot of helpful tools. He also has an afternoon radio show on AM 540 where he takes phone calls and tries to help people through their financial questions on air.

© Cori Endicott March 8, 2013

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