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Archive for February, 2011

Summary:

A beloved little girl is sent to boarding school against her wishes. Once acclimated, she decides to get classmates together to perform at a folk dancing festival in Bergania, a country in Eastern Europe. She unknowingly makes friends with the crown prince, but when tragedy strikes, hopes of a friendship seem dashed. Despite their different backgrounds, the children do their best to keep in touch. But as the prince’s family puts more pressure on him to become more king-like, any hope for a normal life fades. After much desperation, the prince begins to form a plan to escape and join his friend at her school in England. All of this takes places right before England and America enter World War II. Will the prince succeed in his plan or will his family force a life of kingdom on him that he detests?

Opinion:

I enjoyed reading this book and thought the story-line was worthwhile. It is very understandable why she set it during the World War II, since how they get back to England would never work today. The characters were well-developed and as each was introduced you wanted to learn more about them. The age range for the book is middle school, or 10-13 years old.

© Cori Endicott May 2009

 

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Summary:

While the book is dated (1981), it makes compelling points on the value of children’s literature. It takes the reader through the chronological development of children’s literature from the 1900s and on. It emphasizes how important General, non-textbook reading is in the school environment. Also, it provides suggestions for activities for teachers to use in the classroom. Not includes book titles for literature, but it also includes titles in the genres of math and science.

Opinion:

Though out-dated, I found this book to be informative. I would recommend it to any would-be librarian, teacher and parent.

© Cori Endicott April 2009

 

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Summary:

Aimed at MLS students and anyone interested in intellectual freedom/censorship. Guidelines on how to write a selection policy fend off complaints and censors, and basic essential library documents are included within. Selection policies contain Adult book selection, Young Adult book selection, and Children’s book selection.

Opinion:

As a future MLS student and current library employee, this book has helped me understand the book selection process and why some books are chosen over others.

© Cori Endicott 2010

 

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Summary:

Booklet introduces the idea of Bibliotherapy and explains what it is. It goes on to explain the history, processes, and methodology of Bibliotherapy. There is a section dedicated to what type of a person it would take to make a good bibliotherapist. Also, the booklet addresses the limitations of this type of therapy.

Opinion:

Even though the copyright date is 1980, this booklet had interesting information. It was a nice introduction to what Bibliotherapy is, as I had never heard of it before. Personally, I would like to research this topic more and would consider it a possible career choice.

© Cori Endicott

 

 

 

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Summary:

During the 1700s and 1800s, the U.S. and France mirrored each other in what was going on with their respective governments, etc. It is because we Americans have many similarities to the French, but we do things differently, that they cannot help but insult us to our faces. The author lived in France and experienced first hand the French distain. The book took a close look at every political (domestic and international) decision France has made and how it affected their political relationships. It shows how they strictly adhere to the “moi-first” policy. They take care of their own interests, regardless of who suffers. The book includes comics of French situations. Contains sarcasm. Any American and/or Englishman would enjoy this book.

Opinion:

The book gave me a good idea of the French mindset and why they think the way they do. It is very ironic that the things the French accuse America of being, they themselves are guilty of these offenses as well. Yet they feel they have the right to say WE need to change. The author was correct when he said that the French don’t like anyone who doesn’t conform to their views.

© Cori Endicott May 2009

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